10 habits and choices that can help you achieve permanent weight loss

10 habits and choices that can help you achieve permanent weight loss

When most people want to lose weight, they usually go on a diet that restricts calories. These may work, but only temporarily because a return to the person’s normal patterns causes the weight to return. That is frustrating because people try to lose weight with the goal of keeping it off. The key to permanent weight loss is a change in habits. Adopting healthy eating habits and getting rid of bad habits can not only help with lasting weight loss, it can lead to an improvement in health. These are wonderful benefits!

  1. Drink 8 to 10 cups of water each day. Cold water is especially helpful because calories are spent when the body warms it. Tea can aid abdominal fat loss, but it can cause insomnia if consumed after 12:00 p.m. It can also cause some people to urinate too much.
  2. Lift weights at a gym. This helps increase muscle cell size and increase the calories burned even when you are at rest. Muscle burns fifteen times as many calories as fat.
  3. Include some monounsaturated fats in your daily diet. These include walnuts and other nuts, seeds, olives and olive oil, plus avocados. These fats decrease hunger, lower cholesterol, and can help decrease cravings. But they are high in calories so limit them to a small amount daily.
  4. Try to exercise every day, even if it is only for fifteen minutes. This burns some calories, and improves mood.
  5. Eat a rainbow of fruits and vegetables, or, to put it another way, eat a variety of colors of fruits and vegetables. Each color is made of different nutrients and when you eat a variety, you are most likely to get all those you need to burn fat and stay healthy. During winter, choose frozen produce, not canned. Some fruits and many vegetables have fiber that helps you feel full and is good for the intestines. Cabbage, broccoli and cauliflower are especially good at preventing weight gain.
  6. Eggs are an excellent source of protein and have nutrients to help decrease hunger.
  7. Oatmeal is one of the best grains you can eat! It too helps you to feel full, decreases the cholesterol level, is high in fiber but low in calories, and has many important minerals needed for health. It is easy to add other nutrients to oatmeal such as ground flax, wheat germ and wheat bran, ground nuts and berries.
  8. Beans are excellent sources of protein, as well as fiber to help you stay full. They also have many other nutrients.
  9. Another important type of fat to consume each day is omega-3 fatty acids. This is a type of polyunsaturated fat, fats that are essential fatty acids needed for good health. It is most abundant in fatty fish like sardines and salmon. Flaxseeds and walnuts are other sources. They help burn fat, decrease harmful chronic inflammation, and build muscle.
  10. It is important to get at least seven hours of sleep each night. Sleeping less than that increases the hormone ghrelin and that increases hunger feelings. Rest and relaxation also help decrease stress hormones like cortisol that increase the blood sugar level and weight gain.

 

This blog article isn’t meant to replace your primary health care provider.

The next article will cover foods, drinks and habits to give up to promote weight loss and good health. The following one will give suggestions on how to make the changes like giving up bad habits and making the good practices part of your everyday routine.

Chromium: The good, the bad, and the not-so-important

Chromium:  The good, the bad, and the not-so-important

Chromium is found and produced in several different forms. The most common forms are metallic, trivalent and hexavalent. The trivalent form occurs naturally and is an essential nutrient. Its needed for fatty acid and cholesterol production and insulin metabolism. It is found in eggs, meat, cheese, whole grains and certain fruits and vegetables. Metallic chromium isn’t pertinent to this article (Pediatric Environmental Health, 3rd edition, Dr. Ruth Etzel, Editor, and Dr. Sophie Balk, Assoc. Editor. Elk Grove Village, IL:  2012).

Hexavalent chromium is the toxic form. The US National Toxicology Program, World Health Organization, EPA, and International Agency for Research on Cancer have all identified hexavalent chromium as a human carcinogen. It comes mostly from industrial emissions and passes into the air, water, and soil. It’s also part of tobacco smoke. Chromium is used in so many ways it isn’t surprising it is found in more than 50% of the National Priorities List superfund hazardous waste sites as well as many landfills. Fossil fuel burning and steel production are major sources of chromium in the air. The movie Erin Brockovich was about The Pacific Gas and Electric Company’s role in the excessive chromium in water and even though it has been out a long time, this is still a real problem.

Absorption of hexavalent chromium from the lungs is high. Gastrointestinal absorption of this form can be as high as 50% but much of it is converted to the trivalent form. Chromium doesn’t stay in the body very long, so antidotes and chelators aren’t in demand. Vitamin C helps convert hexavalent chromium to the trivalent form. Laboratory assessments are not particularly useful, and environmental documentation is more helpful.

Topical chromium is a common cause of allergic contact dermatitis. Swallowing a large amount of hexavalent chromium could cause nausea, vomiting and acute kidney failure.

The biggest concern is with chronic inhalation of the hexavalent form of chromium. Those at highest risk are those working or who have worked in industries where chromium is used. These individuals have an increased chance of developing nasal and lung cancer. The latter risk increases with the duration of an exposure and there’s about a 13 to 30-year latency period. In “Profiling stainless steel welding processes to reduce fume emissions, hexavalent chromium emissions and operating costs in the workplace,” (by M. Keane, et al in Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene, 2016, v. 13#1, pages 1-8) almost half a million Americans do some welding in their work, and that is a potential exposure. Gas metal arc welding was found to create less exposure to toxic gases.

In “Hexavalent Chromium Is Carcinogenic to F344/N Rats and B6C3F1 Mice” (by M. Stout, et al, in Environmental Health Perspectives, v117, #5, for May 2009, pages 716-722), the possibility of an increased risk for oral, stomach and duodenal cancer with chronic consumption of water polluted with excess chromium was raised. The research done involved giving water with various levels of hexavalent chromium in it to the test animals for 2 years. Before you decide that this isn’t relevant to humans, consider the fact that rats and mice are used in research because they share many biological processes and tissue structures with humans.

This all lends support to having water tested, including well water, before even a sip.